Horse Betting Racing Secret Systems – Punting Tips You Take to the Bank

Let’s face it, making money with horse bet racing is tough. Trying to beat the bookies is a scam, they collect all of the betting money from punters, and then drop the odds off the map seconds before the race starts, leaving you and every other punter out there “hung out to dry”, even if you picked the winner. However, there are still so many proven ways to take consistent winnings with the proper horse betting racing system.

The truth is that 95% of all punters do not make any winnings consistently. This is not because they don’t want to win or are not putting enough effort into their selection processes, but more often than not, this is because the horse bet racing system they use themselves is weak or flawed.

There is a distinct horse betting formula which professional punters use to pull consistent, even full time incomes from horse bet racing. Betting secrets which professionals have spent years developing as well as hiding from the general public. I am going to provide you with a basic overview of the horse betting process and some tips to get you punting with success right off the bat.

1.) This you may find pretty standard, but if you don’t know anything about horse bet racing, or reading racing forms, follow closely. Start by looking at the daily racing form. These are available at the track, a newsstand, bookstore, or you can simply go to the internet. You are going to need to know some of the basics about reading the racing form because this can make all of the difference between a successful and unsuccessful horse betting run.

Reading the days racing form gives us an overview for all of the days events. Which horses will be running, which jockeys will be running, who is the favorite horse before the betting can begin, what time are the races scheduled, etc. Reading the racing form is a must if you are serious about making money through horse betting racing.

2.) You want to gauge each horse in the race field to get an idea of how they have been running in their past events, this is called a horses “form”. Take a look at their past 3 races, how has each horse competed? What place and time did they finish? The speed figures are listed in the racing form and you can then compare a horses average speed and position against other horses in the racing field.

Also, take a look at the distance of the last 3 races each horse has ran. How does the horses last race distances compare to the current days race? Think of it this way, lets say a horse has done well in their last 3 races at 800 meters, maybe even finishing in the money. Now, if the race that particular horse is running today is 1500 meters, we are going to have to be very careful in analyzing the other horses in the racing field. The change in race distance can be negative because the horse may be a better choice at its previously successful distances. So, just because a horse has done well in their last few showings, it does not mean they are ever guaranteed to win. These are just some basic questions you need to learn the answer to before placing any wagers.

3.) Look in depth into the jockey who is riding the horse you may consider betting on. A good jockey can be the difference between a strong finish and your horses potential not being used properly. Take a look at the racing form and see how each jockey stacks up against one another. Some jockey’s are “young” in the horse racing world and may have never even won a race before, while others can be some of the most coveted jockeys in the horse betting racing league. So be sure to see who is riding each horse in a racing field, usually there will be some well known names that stick out above the rest.

4.) Finally, you should look at the favorites in each and every race. Favorites statistically win 30-40% of the time so always be sure to look at a favorite very carefully. There can be different levels of favorites as well. A super favorite may be a horse that seems leagues above the other horses in their particular racing filed, but more often that not each race will have several horses that could be considered a favorite. When this happens you want to be even more careful with your selection process. There are ways to place tri-fecta and quinela wagers which can cover all of your tracks, that is getting into a bit more complicated horse betting secrets though.

The truth is that there is a distinct formula to consistent winnings with horse bet racing secrets. Knowing where, when, and how to act can make all of the difference between a horse betting system that produces consistent results and one that may strike a winner here or there. Horse bet racing is gambling, there is no other way to put it. So there is always going to be some risk involved, but with a well disciplined horse betting racing system you can very easily earn steady profits from smart horse bet racing tactics and take the “gambling” completely out of the equation.

Overcoming the Vig is the Secret to Making Money on Horse Racing Bets

The vig, short for vigorish, is the amount of money taken out of the pools at the track before the winners are paid. For instance, if the bettors wager a total of $10,000 to win in a race, there is a total of $10,000 in the win pool. However, when the race is over and the winners are paid, $10,000 isn’t the amount that gets distributed amongst the winners. It is far less because the track has to take out a certain amount that is determined by the state. That’s the vig.

Part of the money that is taken out is paid to the state and the rest is the track’s share. So let’s say that the vig is 18% and there is $10,000 in the pool. After the race you would expect $8,200 to be distributed among the winners, right? Sorry, it’s not that easy. You see, there is also breakage. What get’s broken and how come you have to pay for it? Why doesn’t the clumsy oaf who dropped it or sat on it and broke it pay for it?

No, no, breakage doesn’t mean something actually got broke, it means that race tracks pay out in nickels and dimes, not pennies, so they get to round a bet down to the nearest nickel or dime. For instance, if a bet would normally pay $6.55, the race track gets to keep the nickel and you get $6.50. Talk about being nickel and dimed!

That breakage may not seem like much, but if you bet $100 and would receive $4.05 for every two dollars bet, but instead receive $4.00, you’ve just donated $2.50 to the track so their tellers don’t have to deal with handling pennies. That’s another 2.5% out of your winnings, too. That $2.50 can really add up after a while, especially if you are trying to make a living by betting on the horse races.

As if overcoming the vig isn’t bad enough, there are other expenses involved in horse racing wagering. On the last day of January I decided to go the horse races. I wasn’t interested in the races at Santa Anita, so I decided to play the simulcasts from Golden Gate Fields. I figured I’d go to Hollywood Park since they didn’t have live racing there and it figured to be much less crowded.

However, what I didn’t take into account was the fact that it was dollar day at Santa Anita so I could have gotten in for $1. When I got to Hollywood, they charged me $7 just for the privilege of going in and watching and wagering on simulcast races. Seven bucks right off the top before I even made a bet or bought a hot dog.

It is at times like these that I ask myself why I don’t just go gamble in a casino where I can park and enter for free and also get a free meal after I’ve gambled for a few hours. $7 to bet on simulcast races? Then they have the nerve to complain because attendance at the races is declining. Gee I can’t figure out why, can you? The last time I went to Santa Anita, I had to pay to park, pay to get in, pay for a racing form. By the time I was done I had invested a small fortune and hadn’t even made a bet.

With all the ways there are to gamble or be entertained now, you would think the tracks would get a clue and start to help us horse players out. As money gets tighter, and it is, the tracks are really going to have to start being creative. Horse players can sit in their own homes now and play the races over the internet. While some of those services do charge you to deposit money, another sore subject with me, at least you are at home and not paying to get into a race track that isn’t even offering live racing.

Well enough of the ranting and raving, I think you get the idea and I hope the race tracks do, too. I’d hate to see racing fade any more than it already has but if it does, it will be because management dove it into the ground. They have a thrilling, live drama, that people can bet on and take part in as gamblers. It is a great product but they can ruin it if they don’t start trying to offer more to the players.

Back to the vig. My expenses for the day were the gas I put in my car to get to the track, the $7 I paid for the privilege of entering the track, the past performances I bought so I could handicap the races, the food I bought while I was at the track. By the time I was done, my expenses were $20. Add that to the breakage and vig and you can see that I would have to make some very good bets that paid well in order to make a profit that made a day of handicapping and travel worthwhile.

That is what you are up against if you are trying to make a profit from betting on horse races, so here is some advice. Cut your costs as much as you possibly can. Get the deals online for past performances. Place your wagers through whatever venue is legally available to you and watch all those incidental expenses that eat away your profit.

It is possible to make money from betting on horse races, but there will always be people who are trying to take as much of it away from you as they possibly can and the first ones standing in that line are the tracks themselves.

Enjoy your days at the races.

The Truth About Horse Racing Handicapping Gimmick Betting

There is no doubt that how you bet is as important as what you bet in horse racing handicapping, if you want to make a profit. Good money management is the key to being able to stay ahead and that is a tough battle when you’re trying to make a living betting on horses. One of the most important lessons you’ll ever learn about gambling and maybe life itself, is that you have to keep track of your money and manage it wisely.

As I’ve often said before, “Good money management will get you through times of poor handicapping better than good handicapping will get you through times of poor money management.”

One of the ways that wise guys will tell you that you can make a profit on your betting is with gimmicks like distributing your money in the pools or increasing the amount of your bets based on your losses. Both of these gimmicks are very dangerous and not based on sound principles. A losing bet is a losing bet no matter how you bet it. If your flat bets don’t make a profit, increasing or decreasing the amount from race to race won’t help.

Let’s say that you’ve just bet on three races and lost on all three. Does that mean you’re more likely to win on the fourth? No. Why would losing three times make you a better handicapper? Please don’t get suckered into the “Law of probability,” myth. There is no law that is enforced regarding how many times you can lose except the law of diminishing returns which means how fast your bankroll disappears.

Martingale betting has been around a lot longer than I have and I am classified as a fossil by the scientific community. People have lost fortunes at the roulette wheel, baccarat tables, and race tracks using this progressive betting scheme. You may get lucky and hit something when your wager amount is increased making you think that the scheme worked, but in the end, you’ll eventually lose.

Another method of betting that has been circulating lately is the idea of spreading your amounts among the various straight betting pools. Bet a small amount to win, more to place, and a lot to show. Where is the logic in this? If a win bet is profitable, why do you need to bet so much to show? The same is true of the place bet.

While backing up your win bets may make sense to preserve your bankroll because your horse is more likely to place or show than it is to win, those bets still have to be able to show a flat bet profit in order for that scheme to work. If you make a flat profit of 10% on your winners but only hit 30% of the time, and make 5% on show bets but hit 60% of the time, you may put some money in the show pool to keep your cash flow, but there has to be an overall profit or you’re still losing.

The way to horse racing profits is through good handicapping and being able to put a price on a bet and then only wagering when the odds are favorable. It is like any other investment. Don’t fall for these gimmicks and you may one day make a profit. It isn’t easy, but desperate measures that make no sense will only make it tougher.

Texas Holdem Tournament Strategy – Winning vs. Aggressive Players

The Texas Hold’em poker phenomenon has taken the country by storm. There are reportedly over 100 million active poker players worldwide. Poker’s popularity is largely the byproduct of technology and several recent trends: 1) online gaming, where players engage and socialize in real-time over the Internet, and 2) the broad publicity created by high profile TV shows like the World Series of Poker and World Poker Tour.

With all the poker-mania, there’s an amazing shortage of quality information to help people learn how to play properly and become great players quickly. This is the first in a series of Texas Holdem strategy articles aimed at helping players learn how to win at Texas Hold’em poker. Tournament play is a popular, fun sport. These articles will help players understand how to approach tournaments, which differ greatly from regular “ring game” play.

This installment deals with the most-asked question: “How do I deal effectively with aggressive players?” Many players struggle against “maniacs”, the aggressive, wild players who play most every hand, somehow seem to pull cards out of thin air, and often manage to dominate the table.

Here’s what actually happened in a recent poker tournament. I entered a tournament at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Hollywood, Florida, about 20 minutes from my home in South Florida. This weekly $300 entry-fee tournament fills the poker room with 220 players every Monday night.

The blinds start at 50/100 and go up every 15 minutes. I spent the first 30 minutes just hanging out and occasionally limping in to see a flop. The reason for “treading water” was to study my opponents and their playing patterns very closely. There were a number of solid poker players, but right away I spotted the aggressive ones.

I was sitting in the middle, directly across from the dealer. There were two “wild men” to my right. These two participated in most every hand, and agonized with themselves whenever they had to throw a hand away. This was hilarious to me, and it was also very telling. I knew these dudes were doomed from the onset, yet they were extremely dangerous if they caught something with one of their trash hands. These types are great targets, but only when you know how to play them correctly. If you do, you’ll end up with most or all of their chips in your stack. The key is to get to their chips before someone else does.

There were some squeaky-tight and solid players, as usual. Finally, there were two other players to my left who knew one another very well and spoke what sounded like Russian. These two played very aggressively. They rarely called or checked. They would bet or raise the pot significantly, so if they played a hand, you knew they were going to bet it big and you’d better be prepared to push a bunch of your chips into the middle. As a result, the table became tight overall, except for these four players who controlled the early action and dictated the table tempo for the first hour or so. They gambled with wanton abandon, trading chips with each other as the rest of us just observed and wished for a real hand to materialize.

It became apparent that our maniacs were playing mostly garbage hands, and using assertive chatter in an attempt to intimidate everyone. They were enjoying pushing everyone around with their aggressive betting and raising style. Humorously, they got into a number of showdowns, causing all of their trash hands to become openly exposed; e.g., 69 off-suit, Q3 suited, etc. I definitely had these guys pegged now – if only I could get a strong hand…

Later, one of my Russian “friends” came in over the top of a bet I’d placed with a huge raise, then smiled at me as he leaned his head back as if to say “Go ahead. I dare you”. My middle pair just wasn’t strong enough to engage with him, but I remembered this little “lesson” and my mistake. He’d used this tactic many times against the others and I should’ve expected it. I also realized that we had not seen any of his supposed “big hands”, as he always mucked them. Whenever you see an aggressive player dominating, and then mucking all those supposed “great hands”, you know you’ve spotted a target.

We played on, with the two maniacs to my right getting busted out by the Russian contingent. It’s been an hour and fifteen minutes – and I still haven’t seen even one decent hand yet! This is, unfortunately, typical poker.

After about an hour-and 45 minutes, I finally pick up a pair of wired 9’s (99). Now I was hoping the flop would yield a set (trips). Sure enough, it came: 9, K, 5. I was elated and jumping up and down (inside). I was finally in a position to make my move, and hoped it would be against one of my aggressive Russian friends with their big stacks.

To prepare my trap, I delayed and muddled around for about ten seconds, and then casually “checked” verbally and using my hand in a chopping motion, with a slightly disgusted look. Next, the younger Russian moves in with a big bet of 3,000 chips. I was sure I had him now. As expected, everyone else quickly folded and got out of his way – except me. This fellow had pushed everyone around and I was finally properly armed and ready to do battle on my own terms. Note that this had been my “battle plan” all along. I was deliberately targeting these aggressive characters, knowing that when the time was right, their ill-gotten stacks would become mine!

The action came back around to me, so now it was just the two of us heads-up. The two Russians said something to each other that the rest of us couldn’t decipher. I delayed and bobbed my head around as if to be struggling with my decision. Then, I motioned with both hands and uttered “I’m all-in”. I knew this series of actions would likely trigger an aggressive reaction, since my “check-raise” made it appear as if I was trying to steal this pot! A check-raise almost always triggers a full-tilt response from an aggressive player.

He immediately called me – he was so aggressive (and pot-committed) that it was like a fish taking the bait and running for deep waters – hook line and sinker! I threw my pair of 9’s over, revealing the trip 9’s. There was a low murmur around the table from the other players. My young Russian friend reluctantly flipped his five/trash hand over – he had a pair of fives (with a King over-card showing on the board!). He was definitely angling to drive me out of this pot with his ascertive play – one too many times…

You see, no one actually gets that many great hands in poker – nobody. If someone plays 30% to 40% or more of the time, they’re just “gambling” and bluffing. This guy thinks he has a “good” hand, because he actually had a real pair – something he doesn’t often have when pushing everyone around with mostly aggressive betting as his only real weapon.

The turn came and it wasn’t a five – then someone pipes up and says “he’s drawing dead”. Believe me, you never want to hear that when you’re in a showdown! I looked over as he said something in Russian to his buddy – another violation of tournament rules, as everyone is compelled to speak English at the tournament table. It wouldn’t matter, as he stood up, grabbed his jacket and left after receiving some consolation from his friend.

His older friend glared over at me and uttered something derogatory in Russian. I had no clue what he said, but I knew from his tone that I didn’t like it. I also knew I’d gotten under his skin by taking down his buddy and raking in all of his chips. I responded with “what’s that, I don’t understand what you’re saying since you’re not speaking English?” loudly so everyone at the table could hear me.

He mumbled something about his friend…I smiled and said politely with a smile “I deliberately laid that trap for your friend and he fell right into it!”, pushing the knife in deeper, knowing he’d be gunning for me anyway – might as well make sure my next trap was fully set. This also signaled to everyone else at the table that whenever I checked or limped, it could be extremely dangerous if assumed to be a sign of weakness – something I’d leverage later as the blinds and antes rose and the proper time to bluff and steal blinds actually arrived.

After a slight pause, my Russian friend noticed that everyone was now looking at him. He looked down at his chips and said “nice play” with a reluctantly polite tone.

Boy, I was elated! My battle plan was definitely becoming field-proven here – and my next target was clearly sighted. It had taken careful observation, planning and a lot of patience to wait for the right hand, and then play it correctly to take this highly-skilled, aggressive player out and rake in all of his chips.

About ten minutes later, it was tournament break time, after two hours of play. I counted my chips, which totaled 14,900 (we started with 5,000 each), then grabbed a quick bite to eat, reflecting on what had just taken place.

Within ten minutes of returning from break, I finally picked up a serious starting hand: Cowboys (KK). I knew it was time for my new Russian friend and me to tango, so I fired out a bet of 3 times the big blind: 3,000 chips, bait that I was sure he couldn’t turn down. Sure enough, he bit – big time. His all-in raise came almost instantaneously, before I could even get my bet onto the table. He was totally ready to engage, and had been laying in wait for me – just like I had planned. I had set him up by taking out his friend and then challenging his poker ego in front of everyone. He just had to retaliate against me – it was a totally predictable “full-tilt” response from this kind of player.

This is what the game of poker is really all about – having a well-defined strategy, the patience to wait for the right hand, and then executing properly. It’s what makes poker a game of strategy instead of a game of chance (for some of us).

He raised by going all-in with around 8,000 chips to my roughly 14,000. I quickly called his all-in bet. Everyone else quickly folded and got out of our way.

I flipped my pocket kings over, then looked him straight in the eye and just smiled. Then someone says “Yeah! Now we’ve got some action!” He sighed and flipped over QQ – he actually had a real hand for a change. That’s one of the problems with these kinds of “semi-solid, aggressive” players, like my Russian friend here, and other poker greats like Gus Hansen. You never really know exactly what to expect from them. Of course, my opponent could’ve held pocket rockets (AA), but I’ll play those KK cowboys strong each and every time I get them, since there’s only one hand that can beat them heads-up. I also knew this aggressive player on tilt was likely to be overplaying his hand, improving my odds significantly.

The flop, turn and river came and went without another Queen and it was done – my cowboys stood up and I had all of both Russian’s stacks, which included most of the other two poor maniac’s chips (who lost to the Russians earlier). This instantly made me by far the chip leader at our table with well over 22,000 chips!

I went from having an average chip stack to being the table chip leader, against tough, aggressive opponents, within less than half an hour by:

a) Playing solid, reasonable tournament poker,

b) Not taking big, undue risks with weak or “drawing” hands,

c) Studying my aggressive prey and where the chips were sitting,

d) Formulating and refining a battle plan while observing the game progress,

e) Remaining patient while waiting for the right hand to make my move, and

f) Executing this plan with precision against a predetermined opponent, and on terms of my choosing – not the opponent’s.

There was no luck involved at all – except that my opponent didn’t hold AA or pull some lucky cards with a trash hand – which was simply playing the odds in my favor.

I started out with a high-level strategy to target aggressive chip leaders, and go after them with strong hands from the right position. I planned this before I ever arrived at the casino that day, or knew who these players would be. Then, I refined my plan once I knew for certain whom the evening’s targets would be and how I’d provoke them. It certainly helped that I caught two decent hands during those first hours of play.

Unfortunately, I later lost to a legitimate full house, but made it into the top 40 – it happens…

The key to playing against aggressive and maniac players is having a viable Texas Holdem strategy you can profit from when you get some good hands. If you have a good plan, you can convert it into a formidable stockpile of chips – a stack that you’ll definitely need as the blinds and antes increase and the tournament field narrows in the latter stages.

This is how I approach Texas Holdem strategy for tournaments now – at least when the tables are full with 8 or more players, some of them aggressive and maniacs. So, the next time you encounter wild and aggressive players at your poker table, get ready to have some fun! It’s like Tae Kwon Do – using the opponent’s own energy and momentum against them.

In the next installment, we’ll detail this Texas Holdem strategy more formally, along with exploring some other tournament tips for playing better Texas Holdem poker.

Until then – good luck!

Rick

How to Play Badugi

How to play Badugi? What it is this Budagi you speak of and where did it come from? If these are questions you have asked in puzzlement then this article is for you.

The game of Badugi is a very fun and addictive game that has recently over the last few months become available on the biggest pokersite online, PokerStars.

Until approximately 2006, Badugi was a form of poker unknown outside of the likes of China and Korea. Today, this fascinating and fun poker variant is growing more and more popular each day; online as well as offline. Badugi is today played worldwide and many pokers enthusiasts love the combination of exciting poker elements and psychology.

It has previously been spread by a few online poker operators such as Doyles Room, Royal Card Room, Paddy Power and VC Poker, as well some live poker rooms in California and Las Vegas. I have heard that during the WSOP of 2008, Budagi was offered on Sunday nights at the Imperial Palace – Las Vegas, and also the Venetian will spread Badugi on demand.

There was a badugi article written online, where the writer heard former WSOP main event winner Greg Raymer make reference to playing $400-$800 BOT (Badugi, Omaha 8, Triple Draw), so the game is very much the rage and in demand in the high stakes mixed games in Vegas. But it is not a game that is just reserved for the live nosebleed stakes.

You could play as low as $0.05/$0.10 limit and as high as $100/$200 blinds in the online casinos mentioned above, but the game will very soon become much more widely available with the number one pokersite in the world, Pokerstars offering Budagi.

Badugi is a triple draw four card games where the low-hand wins. Don’t panic if you are not familiar with triple draw as badugi strategy is very straight forward and easy to learn. You can play Badugi as limit poker, pot limit poker or half pot limit poker. It is said that Pokerstars will be offering both limit and half-limit Budagi games initially.

So, to get back to the 1st sentance in this article, how to play badugi?

Some basic badugi poker strategy to begin with  – An A-2-3-4 rainbow is the best hand possible in badugi. Played with a button, a small blind, and a big blind, each player is dealt four down cards to start. There are four betting rounds, one after the deal, and one after each of the three draws. Like deuce-to-seven triple draw, badugi is a naturally shorthanded game due to all the discards- only six players maximum can be dealt in at any time.

I believe Budagi could be a very good game to get into as not a lot of people play it well. After Hold’em became a bit stale and the games got tougher after UEIGA and the Online Poker Regulations in the USA, all the mid-stakes grinders jumped on the Omaha bandwaggon and looked to make their money where the fish where still a plenty and the tables weren’t full of 4 or 5 regs. However, even Omaha is getting tougher now as people are getting more and more in tune with the fact that they can’t play Omaha like they do Hold’em!

Most players experimenting at low limit badugi frankly have no clue what they are doing, and this game can be a great money-maker for even reasonably skilled players with some good poker instincts. If you’re a fan of razz or triple draw, badugi is the logical next step for you. Keep your tilt-meter in check and give the games on Pokerstars a whirl.