Two Golden Rules of Horse Racing Handicapping and Betting

Almost every human endeavor has a golden rule that the participants need to learn in order to be successful. Handicapping horse races is no exception. There are a few truths of the game that every horseplayer will eventually discover, many times by experience. While knowing the golden rules may not make you successful, not knowing the golden rules will almost always contribute to your failure.

There are many ways to arrive at a horse to bet on or an exotic combination, however the golden rules are immutable. They do not change no matter how many races you play or what kind of race you play. Off track or fast track, they don’t change. There are times when you’ll hate them and other times when you will rely on them. Don’t take them personally. They were true before you were born and when you’ve cashed your final ticket, they will still be going strong.

The first rule is that nothing works all the time. By that I mean that any angle you can think of or discover will work some of the time, but nothing will work all the time. There are sad stories of a horse player discovering an angle and playing it on paper for a long time before finally taking the plunge and betting on that angle. He builds confidence, it seems to always make him money so he finally mortgages the agrarian business and puts it all into his new money making wonder only to have the universe pull the switcheroo and to have it stop working.

He pours more and more into it certain that it will start to work again and make him money and guess what? That laughing sound you hear is the god’s having a good yuk on the hapless gambler because he didn’t believe it when he read that almost anything will work some of the time, but nothing works all the time.

Rule two is value and all that it implies when it comes to finding bets. Good horseplayers don’t look for good horses, they look for good bets and in my experience they are hard to find. What makes a bet a good one? Profit over the long run is the answer. It is a racing and betting scenario that when played many times will return the bettor’s original investment along with a profit. Some call it ROI. Because things are always changing at the track those profitable scenarios come and go which leads us back to rule one.

BE creative and always keep an open mind. Keep looking for the next good angle and don’t bet a dead horse when the universe hits the “off” switch and the angle goes South, so to speak. Know when to play it and when to pass it up.

Horse Betting Strategy – How To Succeed In Horse Betting

Most racing bettors need a horse gambling strategy to help them win on a regular basis. However, there are so many different types of horse betting strategies found on the internet, making it hard to identify one horse racing strategy that is considered the most “profitable”.

In a nutshell, a racing betting strategy is a strategy that helps you win on a regular basis, which is based on statistics and information. Professional horse gamblers often have a horse racing strategy that they use for every bet, and they usually end up making money. This is because their strategy has been proven to be consistent.

In order to find a profitable horse bet strategy, you can search through the internet and forums to hear others share about their horse betting strategies and experiences. Then you will have to decide whether the horse betting strategy that you have identified is reliable, and whether it will be profitable. This step involves good judgment skills. If you are beginner, it is recommended that you buy a whole ebook or guide or horse betting strategies, since these guides usually contain information that are more complete and assembled together.

It is a fact that there are many people who make a living simply by using their racing betting strategy. However it takes skill, discipline and practice to perfect any horse racing strategy. The most important aspect to control is your emotions. It is very crucial that if you have a horse betting strategy, you should follow it no matter what others tell you, or what other punters are buying. If your horse race strategy does not permit you to do something, then don’t do it!

A consistent race betting strategy is one that will always make you a profit no matter how much money you started with. This is because a good horse racing strategy will always allow you to play the right odds long enough for you to profit. Once you have identified a profitable horse bet strategy, it becomes easier to leverage it and earn more and more money.

In order to profit from horse racing betting, it is very important to have a race betting strategy. Without a consistent horse betting strategy it is impossible to make any money from horse betting. If you read about any professional horse racing bets professionals, you will realize that all of them have a horse bet strategy, whether they are similar or not.

To start becoming a successful horse racing gambler, you should first explore the internet and read about other horse bettors’ experiences. Once you have researched on the alternative horse betting strategies, it is time to choose a horse betting strategy.

Making money from horse racing betting is very enjoyable and profitable, and you need a profitable horse gambling strategy to make that happen. So stop dreaming about making money from horse gambling, and start taking action today.

Horse Racing: How To Grasp Profitcapping And Return On Investment

How to grasp Profitcapping and return on investment or ROI is the main reason for horse racing and not simply racing for the sake of racing. Players are there to make money or to profit. People handicap horses so they can pick the horse they believe is going to come across the wire and make them more money than they put in. Racing’s about investing and not gambling. All gambling is investing but not all investing is gambling. You can predict a thing by yourself but it takes two or more persons to bet. When you wager anything on a bet whether it’s a car, house, money, jewelry, etc. you’re gambling.

The difference between gambling and business investing is: when you have a 51%-100% chance of losing the endeavor you’re gambling and when you have a 49% or less chance of losing the endeavor you’re business investing. Every time you invest (gamble or business invest) you need to know you’re chances of profiting or losing money in detail. Taking a business perspective of racing is the most sensible option because racing has to seen for what it is: a business. Players don’t go into detail enough to study racing as a business overall.

Players consider handicapping the main way to think about making money. But it’s a matter of understanding ROI over months and years ahead. Knowing how much can be made on a long-term basis. As an example: lets say you take a simple random statistical sampling of 2100 trifecta payouts for one year. This amount turns out to be $220,000 after all payouts are added. A ticket for each race sampled is bought and the sum invested is $100,000. You lose 1000 races and win 1100 races. When the year is over you add up all of the money you got back after the investment and it turns out to be $120,000.

You made a $20,000 profit. But $220,000 minus $120,000 = $100,000 and this is the payout money you didn’t get. And if at the years’ end you get back $85,000 then your loss is $15,000. Or $100,000 minus $85,000 = $15,000. In other words it’s what you’ve invested plus or minus what you got back. If you put in $100,000 and get back $100,000 then you broke-even. This is how to grasp profitcapping and return on investment or ROI and what it’s all about. This isn’t all there is to Profitcapping. Indeed there’s much more to say the least.

This way you can see years ahead in the game. Profit or ROI in racing is simple. You endeavor to get back more than you put in for a specific time period. Be it a week, month, year or several years. Simple statistics lets you do this and know this in a highly specific way of how much money is there and how much must be spent buying tickets over that specific time period to make a profit or Profit – capping. Capping means the process of predicting a thing. What are you going to predict? the horses and the money. This is part of how to grasp profitcapping and return on investment.

Breakage in Horse Betting

Breakage in horse betting isn’t something that’s broken. It actually refers to the rounding down of the odds at the tote board in every racetrack in this country. In a pari-mutuel betting pool, breakage can affect how much payout you receive once you cash in on your winning bets at the window.

In the United States, a dime breakage is used. This means that the odds are rounded down to the nearest tenths. For example, if a fair odds on a particular horse are placed at 5.73/1, it would be rounded down to 5.7/1 before the payoffs are calculated. Following the usual computation, dime breakage would usually round down payouts to the nearest multiple of 20 cents. So instead of receiving a payout of $15.33, you will receive only $15.20 when you cash in your winning ticket.

How does breakage affect your bets?

Depending on the type of bet you place, breakage can either have no effect or take out a huge dent from your winnings. You won’t know ahead of time how much a breakage is going to cost you since in a pari-mutuel pool, the amount can’t be determined until the windows close. However, a safe assumption would be that your payout can reduce by as much as 19 cents and about 10 cents on the average depending on the odds

When you think about it, 10 cents isn’t much when you’re expecting a payout of say, $12. However, when you’re talking about winning minimum wagers such as $2.40, then a breakage of even 5 cents can be very steep.

One interesting thing to note about breakage is that it’s better to play a horse with odds placed at 1/9. This is because for win wagers, the minimum payout is $2.40 and even if the payout is supposed to be lower for a 1/9 odds, the track is required to give the minimum payout, so there’s no breakage to worry about here.

How do you get your wagers from getting affected by breakage?

There’s really no way you can avoid it. You can simply choose to bet in situations when breakage won’t figure in heavily, for example, in longshots or in exotic wagers like trifectas. Breakage is an issue in favorites and in place and show pools. But this approach would severely limit your betting. It’s much better to simply view breakage as part of the whole process and that while it could cost you heavily on certain days, it will also not matter much in others. Eventually, it will just even out.

Breakage shouldn’t take the fun out of betting.

Cooper’s Law – 14 Easy to Follow Rules to Make Money From Horse Racing

Betting on tri-casts seems an improbable means to punting profit, but professional backer Paul Cooper used it to win nearly £400,000 on a series of bets at Thirsk.

Cooper was one of the first to capitalize on the fact that horses drawn high seemed to have a pronounced advantage over the straight sprint course at Thirsk. There are a number of tracks around the country where, in soft ground, a particular draw can prove an enormous asset, but at Thirsk the same was true on fast going. It appears that the inadequacies of the course watering system left a strip of ground under the stand rails ‘un-sprinkled’ which was significantly faster than the rest of the track. By betting the five or six highest draw numbers – those most likely to grab the favoured ground – Cooper was able to pull off a series of major coups.

‘I was hooked on betting at a very young age,’ admits Cooper. ‘But even then I knew that you had to be in control of it – otherwise it would control you.’

During the 1970’s, the ITV Seven was introduced. It immediately caught Cooper’s eye. ‘One of my first wagers was a £1.90 bet which won over £800. I was in business! A couple of years later, I collected £13,365 on a £3 accumulator and I was really on my way.’ Cooper is still fascinated by multiple bets – the prospect of huge returns for a small outlay – and believes serious punters should not treat them in such a cavalier fashion.

‘The Lucky 15 is a value bet.- it is a Yankee that also has four win singles, and the different bookies offer a variety of bonuses and consolations. For instance, if only one of your selections wins, you may get double the odds. So just one 7/1 winner virtually guarantees your money back.’

Cooper’s penchant for what Barney Curley calls ‘miracle bets’ is not his only apparent similarity with the man in the street. Like all betting shop regulars, he is irresistibly drawn to competitive handicaps where they bet 6/1 the field – but he hits the target far more often.

Cooper insists that studying trainers is the key to his whole business operation. The fact that, as an owner, he has chosen to have horses trained by Barry Hills, Jimmy Fitzgerald and Robert Williams gives a clue to the men he most respects in the game.’ ‘There are certainly some trainers I much prefer to back,’ he says. ‘What I really look for is someone who is perhaps underestimated and as a result their horses start at bigger prices than they should do.’

So what can we learn from the fastidious, immaculately turned-out Mr Cooper? Well, here are his 7 great Do’s and Don’ts, known as “Cooper’s Law!”

Cooper’s Law – Dos

1: Do stay cool, calm and collected when making a selection, and don’t go in head down. Weigh up all the possibilities and then have the nerve to go through with it.

2: Do bet only when you are getting good value and shop around for the best early prices.

3: Do back horses that have winning form. Shy away from maidens – the form is unpredictable and unproven.

4: Do bet in sprints. The form is often more reliable than in longer distance flat races.

5: Do find a small, competent yard to follow; because it isn’t fashionable, you’ll almost certainly get a value price on their horses.

6: Do look at horses in the paddock, especially in the spring and autumn. You can usually discard quite a few which are obviously not ready or are showing all the signs of a hard season.

7: Do bet within your means. Reduce your stakes when having a bad run – and increase them when things are going well.

Cooper’s Law – Avoid

1: Don’t get drunk or mix alcohol with betting. You need your wits about you to pick winners and to deal objectively with losing.

2: Don’t back short-priced favorites. The returns simply isn’t good enough, and let’s face it, they often get turned over anyway.

3: Don’t chase your losses. There’s always another day.

4: Don’t bet heavily when there’s been a sudden change in the going.

5: Don’t back out of form trainers or stables or jockeys carrying overweight.

6: Don’t back heavily at Chester. The tight track is a law unto itself.

7: Don’t bet in races over 18 runners. This is when the horses will split into two or more groups, effectively making it two or three different races.